Programming and Activities

A quality program provides a well-rounded variety of activities and opportunities that support the physical, social, and cognitive growth and development of all participants. A quality program provides youth with guidance and emotional support; staff take a genuine interest in youth and their academic, social, physical, and emotional development. Staff use strategies that are geared toward encouraging youth to push beyond their present level of competency. The activities are well-organized and age-appropriate, provide exposure to new ideas, and offer opportunities to learn and build new skills, problem solve, and build community.

Indicators & Performance Levels

(Click on the indicator to expand the performance level examples, or download the full set of indicators and performance levels here.)

A quality program:

Performance Levels
Rate your program in each of the indicators using the following system:

1 Must Address and Improve / Standards Not Met
2 Some Progress Made / Approaching Standard
3 Satisfactory / Meets Standards
4 Excellent / Exceeds Standards

Organizations are expected to strive for a satisfactory performance level (3) on all of the quality indicators.

Over time, programs should continue to strive for an excellent performance level (4).

1. Provides activities that reflect the mission of the program.

Performance Level 1
Activities are selected based on materials, staff members’ interests, and space available.

Performance Level 2
Activities that reflect the program mission are prioritized, but some activities that do not reflect the program mission are offered.

Performance Level 3
The program mission serves as the foundation for all activities selected. Activity and lesson plans include explanations of how the activity supports the program mission.

Performance Level 4
The program mission serves as the foundation for all activities developed and selected. Activity and lesson plans include explanations detailing how the activity supports the program mission. Staff members are encouraged to explain the mission to youth participants and offer rationale and the connectedness of the mission to the program activities. Youth have the opportunity to give feedback on the relationship between the program mission and activities regularly throughout the year.

2. Addresses academic, physical, social, and emotional needs of the participants.

Performance Level 1
The program focuses exclusively on one or two aspects of youth needs, such as academic or physical. Activities are narrow in scope and address only one or two youth needs.

Performance Level 2
The program includes several aspects of youth needs but is not designed to fully address all of them. Some participants are disengaged in the program because it does not address their individual needs.

Performance Level 3
The program focuses on all aspects of youth strengths and needs, including academic, physical, social, and emotional needs. The program is designed in consideration of the whole child and incorporating a variety of sequential activities and teaching styles into the schedule each day. Participants are engaged in the program because it uses differentiated methods and personalized activities that build on their strengths to meet their individual needs.

Performance Level 4
The program focuses on all aspects of youth strengths and needs, including academic, physical, social, and emotional needs. The program is designed in consideration of all youth needs, and always incorporates a variety of sequential activities and teaching styles. Participants are engaged in the program because it is personalized, based on strengths, and uses differentiated methods and activities to meet their individual needs. In addition, activity plans require staff members to indicate how they meet the different needs of youth participating in the activity and youth assessments assist staff and youth with determining if youth needs are met.

3. Features activities that are commensurate with the age and skill level of the participants and enable participants to develop new skills during the program year.

Performance Level 1
Activities are not selected based on the age and skill level of the participants. There is no evidence that participants develop new skills during the program year.

Performance Level 2
Activities are selected with some consideration of the age and skill level of the participants. Staff members are unaware of youth developmental stages. There is some anecdotal evidence that participants develop new skills during the program year.

Performance Level 3
Activities are selected based on the age and skill level of the participants. Staff members consider youth developmental stages when planning activities. There is some research-based and anecdotal evidence that participants develop new skills during the program year. Participants can often select from a number of activities that expose them to new concepts and skill-building opportunities.

Performance Level 4
Participants are broken into small activity groups so activities can be selected and tailored based on the age and skill level of each participant. Staff members consider youth developmental stages when planning activities and monitor participants’ development across stages. There is significant research-based and anecdotal evidence that participants develop new skills during the program year. Participants can always select from a number of activities that expose them to new concepts and skill-building opportunities.

4. Offers project-based, experiential activities that promote creativity and development of participant self-expression.

Performance Level 1
The program exclusively offers academic activities, such as homework help and math drills, or adult-led activities with no experiential learning opportunities for youth.

Performance Level 2
The program primarily offers academic activities such as homework help and math drills. Non-academic activities are primarily adult-led with few project-based or experiential learning opportunities for youth. While some creative activities are incorporated into the program, they are offered to only some youth or on an irregular basis.

Performance Level 3
The program offers some academic and some experiential learning activities. Both academic and non-academic topics are approached using youth-centered, project-based, and experiential activities. Youth are encouraged to participate in new projects that assist them to build new skills and enhance existing skills. Youth are encouraged to give feedback on projects and activities.

Performance Level 4
The program offers academic and non-academic, youth-centered, project-based, and experiential activities. Youth help to choose projects and activities, as well as the way in which they will be offered. Youth assessments and input assist in the development and selection of skills to build, enhance and maintain. Youth are encouraged to share feedback with staff members regarding how projects and activities built upon and enhanced their strengths and skills and helped them to achieve their goals. Staff members use youth feedback to inform activity planning. Staff members are trained on using teaching methods and youth development strategies that foster engagement, leadership, personal, social, and academic skill development as well as creativity and self-expression.

5. Offers high quality academic support, including tutoring and/or homework help.

Performance Level 1
The program only includes non-academic activities such as creative arts and/or sports and recreation.

Performance Level 2
The program includes mostly non-academic activities such as creative arts or sports and recreation, but occasionally includes scholastic activities such as science projects. The program provides academic support when participants ask for assistance. Some staff members have the skills or information necessary to provide academic support to participants, but are not trained in this area.

Performance Level 3
The program provides academic support on a regular schedule, including tutoring and homework help. The program schedule includes both academic and non-academic activities, including a variety of activities related to history, art, science, math and technology, languages, and sports and recreation. Staff members must show the ability to support academic learning before they are hired by providing sample lesson plans or demonstrating knowledge of teaching methods. Staff members receive ongoing training on best practices in supporting the academic and cognitive development of youth.

Performance Level 4
The program provides daily, regularly scheduled academic support, including tutoring and homework help. The program schedule includes both academic and non-academic activities, including a variety of activities related to history, art, science, math, and technology, languages, and sports and recreation. Staff members must show the ability to support academic learning before they are hired by providing sample lesson plans or demonstrating knowledge of teaching methods. At least one certified teacher is on staff at all times. Staff members receive ongoing training on best practices in supporting the academic and cognitive development of youth, and selecting developmentally -appropriate activities that support statewide learning standards.

6. Offers enrichment opportunities in core academic areas as well as in the arts, technology, recreation, and health.

Performance Level 1
The program exclusively offers single activities, such as soccer or painting, which do not directly enrich participants’ academic development.

Performance Level 2
The program offers one or two types of enrichment activities that are not sequential. While these activities may enrich participants’ academic and personal development, they do not address a variety of enrichment areas. Youth who are not interested in the topic being offered seem disengaged.

Performance Level 3
The program offers many types of activities that enrich participants’ academic and personal development in a variety of areas, including core academics, arts, technology, recreation, and health. Several types of enrichment activities are offered each day and over time to appeal to all participants. Therefore, youth are almost always able to choose an activity that appeals to them.

Performance Level 4
The program offers many types of activities that enrich participants’ academic and personal development in a variety of areas, including core academics, arts, technology, recreation, and health. The site director maintains curricula and other resources at the program site to enable staff to effectively lead activities. Several types of enrichment activities are sequenced over time and offered each day to appeal to all participants and build related knowledge and skills. Therefore, youth are almost always able to choose an activity that appeals to them and learn and grow as a result of participation. Staff members are asked to encourage youth to try many types of activities to ensure they are exposed to a variety of enrichment areas.

7. Includes activities that take into account the language and culture of the participants.

Performance Level 1
Activities are mostly planned without consideration for the language and culture of the participants.

Performance Level 2
Activities are often planned with consideration for the language and culture of the participants. If a participant cannot be engaged in an activity because of a barrier related to language or culture, no alternative is provided.

Performance Level 3
Activities are always planned with consideration for the language and culture of the participants. Because youth can choose their activity, they almost never feel excluded from the program because of a barrier related to language or culture. If a participant feels uncomfortable with an activity, staff members are available to help the participant find an alternative.

Performance Level 4
Activities are always planned with consideration for the language and culture of the participants. Because youth can choose their activity, they never feel excluded from the program because of barriers related to language or culture. The participants’ languages and cultures are often highlighted through activities, therefore allowing participants to showcase themselves throughout the year. Staff members are trained in cultural sensitivity and take it into account from program planning through execution.

8. Establishes and follows a schedule that is known to all staff, participants, and their families.

Performance Level 1
The activity schedule changes daily and is not posted anywhere for staff, participants, and families to view. Participants are not able to plan their participation in activities before the program starts. There is sometimes confusion about which activities are taking place and where they are being held. Occasional double booking occurs.

Performance Level 2
The activity schedule changes daily and is posted for staff to view. Participants do not see the schedule and are not able to plan their participation in activities before the program starts. Families often need the help of a staff member to locate their child. There is sometimes confusion about which activities are taking place and where they are being held.

Performance Level 3
The activity schedule changes daily and is posted for staff, participants, and families to view each day. Participants are able to plan their participation in activities before the program starts. Families can find their child without the help of a staff member. There is rarely confusion about which activities are taking place and where they are being held.

Performance Level 4
The activity schedule changes daily and a weekly schedule is posted for staff, participants, and families to view at the start of each week. Participants are able to plan their participation in activities for the entire week, and know in advance if activities will span across multiple days. Families can find their child without the help of a staff member. Staff members and youth are aware of which activities are taking place and where they are being held.

9. Provides a range of opportunities in which participants’ work can be showcased.

Performance Level 1
Participants’ work is not showcased at the program site.

Performance Level 2
Participants’ work is showcased irregularly at the program site. Participants can bring their projects to a staff member to have it placed on display. Depending on the staff members and activities being offered, occasional performances are held.

Performance Level 3
Participants’ work is showcased regularly at the program site throughout the year. Every participant who completes a project is encouraged to leave it at the site on display for several weeks before bringing it home. Each year, staff members organize a performance in which participants can dance, sing, or showcase another talent. Families are invited to watch these performances.

Performance Level 4
Participants’ work is showcased regularly at the program site throughout the year. Every participant is encouraged to complete a project which can be displayed on site; every participant has their work on display year-round. Each year, staff members organize a performance in which every participant contributes. Participants have the option to dance, sing, showcase another talent, or work “behind the scenes.” Families and other community members are invited to watch these performances.

10. Integrates opportunities for the development of personal responsibility, self-direction, and leadership throughout the program.

Performance Level 1
Staff members schedule participants’ activities with no leadership opportunities or areas of responsibility for youth. Staff members make decisions and solve issues for youth as they arise.

Performance Level 2
Staff members decide upon and schedule most activities with youth providing input on an occasional and informal basis. Staff members make most decisions for youth, but occasionally ask a few youth to speak or lead an activity.

Performance Level 3
Staff members are beginning to create a youth leadership team to provide input and feedback and assist with activity selection. A majority of the staff members are able to support youth as they complete tasks on their own or do learner-centered projects. Constructive feedback is provided to challenge youth to move beyond their current level of competency. Participants can often choose from a variety of leadership roles and opportunities in the program.

Performance Level 4
An adult and youth leadership team plans, implements, and assesses all aspects of the afterschool program. Youth receive extensive leadership training and have meaningful voices, roles, and participation. Youth feel ownership of the program and know that they play a significant role in their success and the success of the program. All activities and projects encourage youth to discover their strengths and set and achieve personal goals with support from peers and the staff. Staff members refrain from taking over challenging tasks, but rather use questioning, coaching, and other effective strategies to build the capacity of youth. Verbal and public recognitions and celebrations are provided to encourage and acknowledge self-direction and success. Participants can always choose from a variety of leadership opportunities in the program.

11. Provides reasonable accommodations and special materials as necessary for youth with disabilities during the program and at special events.

Performance Level 1
The program is unable to provide most accommodations for youth with disabilities, and therefore does not include some youth. Program leaders may direct families to other programs in the community to meet the needs of their child.

Performance Level 2
The program provides some accommodations for youth with disabilities by providing alternative activities when a participant’s level of ability creates a barrier to participation. Youth with disabilities are sometimes unable to participate in special events, such as field trips, where special accommodations are not provided.

Performance Level 3
The program provides a wide range of accommodations for youth with disabilities by providing special materials, resources, and supports that allow all youth to participate in all activities. Youth with disabilities are always able to participate in special events, such as field trips, where special accommodations are provided as well.

Performance Level 4
The program provides a wide range of accommodations for youth with disabilities by providing special materials, resources, and supports that allow all youth to participate in all activities. Several staff members are trained in inclusive techniques and they ensure that all youth are comfortable and engaged, regardless of their level of ability. Youth with disabilities are always able to participate in special events, such as field trips, where special
accommodations are provided as well.

12. Employs a variety of grouping strategies, for both structured and unstructured activities, including individual, small group, and large group.

Performance Level 1
Most or all of the program activities are implemented using the same grouping strategy (e.g. individual work, small group activities, or large group activities).

Performance Level 2
Most of the program activities are implemented using the same grouping strategy, with some slight variation (e.g. activities are mostly done in small groups, while homework is done individually and sports are done in large groups).

Performance Level 3
Program activities use varied grouping strategies, with all types of activities (e.g. homework, enrichment, snacks, sports, arts, etc.) being offered in individual, small group, and large group settings. Each staff member tries to rotate the type of grouping strategies they use.

Performance Level 4
Program activities use varied grouping strategies, with all types of activities (e.g. homework, enrichment, snacks, sports, arts, etc.) being offered in individual, small group, and large group settings. Staff members work together to rotate the types of grouping strategies used across the program, and ensure that all participants are exposed to a variety of activities in individual, small group, and large group settings.

13. Provides regular opportunities to be outdoors.

Performance Level 1
The program does not have access to safe space outdoors and rarely or never goes on field trips or uses other community space. Therefore, youth rarely have an opportunity to be outdoors.

Performance Level 2
The program has access to safe space outdoors (or shares safe community spaces) and allows youth to spend time outside on an ad hoc basis depending on the program schedule. Youth may not have regular opportunities to be outdoors. Time spent outdoors is often for unstructured play or sports.

Performance Level 3
The program has access to safe space outdoors (or shares safe community spaces) and allows youth to spend time outside on a regular basis each week. Youth always have regular opportunities to be outdoors. Time spent outdoors is used for unstructured play, sports, and community exploration (e.g. nature activities, visiting community resources, etc.).

Performance Level 4
The program has access to safe space outdoors (or shares safe community spaces) and allows youth to spend time outside on a regular basis each day. Youth always have regular opportunities to be outdoors. Time spent outdoors is used for unstructured play, sports, and community exploration (e.g. nature activities, visiting community resources, etc.). The program supports a walking transportation system where youth can walk to and from the
program with adult supervision instead of taking a bus or car.

14. Provides supports as children and youth transition across age groups and school grades, and school day to afterschool.

Performance Level 1
The program does not consider supporting children and youth to transition across age groups and school grades and/or school day to afterschool to be one of its objectives. A few participants receive this type of support by individual staff members, but most do not.35

Performance Level 2
The program considers supporting children and youth to transition across age groups and school grades and/or school day to afterschool to be one of its objectives, but it is not a core piece of work. Staff members are asked to support participants in this way, but this is not included in staff training or assessments, and is generally not a priority. Some participants receive this type of support by individual staff members, while others do not.

Performance Level 3
The program considers supporting children and youth to transition across age groups and school grades and school day to afterschool to be one of its objectives and a core piece of work. Staff members are asked to support participants in this way, and training on transitions is provided at staff orientation. Some staff use special techniques at the beginning of the program to help participants move seamlessly from school to afterschool. At the end of each year, the program works with schools to prepare participants who are graduating into a new school (e.g. guest lectures from teachers, field trips to local schools, etc.). All participants receive this type of support.

Performance Level 4
The program considers supporting children and youth to transition across age groups and school grades and school day to afterschool to be one of its objectives and a core piece of work. Staff members are asked to support participants in this way, and training on transitions is provided at staff orientation and during professional development opportunities throughout the school year. All staff use special techniques at the beginning of the program to help participants move seamlessly from school to afterschool. During the spring and summer, the program works with schools to prepare participants for promotion to the next grade or graduation to a new school (e.g. guest lectures from teachers, field trips to local schools, etc.). All participants receive this type of support.

15. Offers activities that develop global competencies in youth, build 21st century skills (e.g. digital literacy, cross-cultural skills, innovative thinking, etc.), and prepare them for college, career, and citizenship.

Performance Level 1
The program focuses primarily on keeping youth safe and engaged afterschool, and does not focus on preparing youth for college, career, and citizenship. Some activities may develop global competencies and 21st century skills, but they are not intentionally designed to do so or evaluated.

Performance Level 2
The program considers preparing youth for college, career, and citizenship to be a goal, but does not offer activities specifically tied to this goal. Some activities may develop global competencies and 21st century skills, but they are not intentionally designed to do so or evaluated. Some staff members try to help participants build cultural competence, world knowledge, digital literacy, and other key skills, but not all youth are exposed to these staff members and activities.

Performance Level 3
The program considers preparing youth for college, career, and citizenship to be a goal, and offers activities that are designed to help youth develop global competencies and 21st century skills. Several staff members try to help participants build cultural competence, world knowledge, digital literacy, and other key skills, and all youth are exposed to these staff members and activities. Youth have regular opportunities to work with peers of different cultures and backgrounds, to learn about world news and events, and to use technology and media.

Performance Level 4
The program considers preparing youth for college, career, and citizenship to be a goal, and offers activities that are designed to help youth develop global competencies and 21st century skills, and evaluations review how well the program is meeting this goal. The program policies and structure are designed to foster this type of development. Many or all staff members try to help participants build cultural competence, world knowledge, digital literacy, and other key skills, and all youth are exposed to these staff members and activities. Youth have regular opportunities to work with peers and adults of different cultures and backgrounds, to learn about world news and events, and to use technology and media. Youth are exposed to a variety of career paths and understand the experiences and skills needed to attain them.



Taking Action, Suggested Stakeholders, Try This!, and Tips for Success

RIGHT NOW: ADDRESSED WITHIN THE FIRST 30-60 DAYS OF ASSESSMENT.
Staff are trained on strategies and activities that promote youth leadership. A staff meeting is set up to discuss and identify leadership roles for youth in the program. A plan is developed for how these roles will be encouraged and supported.

THIS YEAR: ADDRESSED BY THE END OF THE PROGRAM YEAR.
Staff participate in ongoing training to provide the tools and skills needed to empower young people to creatively resolve conflicts and develop activities that intentionally develop youth leadership. Staff meet on a quarterly basis to share promising practices and determine new strategies for creating opportunities for young people to take personal responsibility, become self-directed, and natural leaders.

NEXT YEAR: ADDRESSED AT THE BEGINNING OF THE NEW PROGRAM YEAR.
Staff and young people meet to build on what has worked from the prior year. A youth council is created to institutionalize youth leadership positions across the agency. Community meetings and annual events are scheduled to be led by youth and used as a tool to build community.

The following stakeholder groups may be appropriate to involve in surveys and focus group discussions around this element:

  • Program Administrators
  • Program Staff
  • Program Participants
  • Parents
  • School Teachers
  • School Guidance Counselors
  • School Principals
  • Staff of Partner Programs
  • Other

Through the Years

It is essential that staff have a basic understanding of youth developmental stages as they design and implement program activities. Consider using a staff meeting to facilitate a mini-workshop that introduces staff to the stages of development.

Divide meeting participants into small groups. The facilitator assigns each group a specific age range and asks them to brainstorm a list of developmentally appropriate program environments and activities, keeping in mind emotional, cognitive, social, and physical needs. Participants are then asked to share a few examples.

As a large group, brainstorm the activities currently offered through your program and identify how they support youth development. What core academic skills are being strengthened and developed through these activities? In what ways do these activities support emotional learning and self-expression? How do these activities promote health and physical well-being?

Afterschool programs are positioned to provide young people with a myriad of rich activities and experiences that support their overall well-being and health. Below are some basic principles that can be incorporated into all activities regardless of content. Afterschool professionals should:

  • Provide a clear overview, learning objectives, and rationale for activities.
  • Engage young people in hands-on activities and discussion.
  • Allow young people to tap into their individual strengths and talents.
  • Provide young people with multiple opportunities to reflect upon what they have experienced.
  • Provide young people with positive reinforcement.
  • Be able to adapt to different learning styles.
  • Employ strategies that engage young people who may be resistant to participating.

Research, Tools and Templates, and Resources

  • Afterschool Training Tool Kit, National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Programming
    Links and resources on lesson plans and curricula for use in afterschool settings.
  • Afterschool Curriculum Resources, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, National Partnership for Quality Programs
    Database of curricula for use in afterschool settings in four categories: literacy, mathematics, science, and technology.
  • Beyond the Chalkboard, Boston Children’s Museum
    Website with curriculum and multiple child friendly activities for use in afterschool settings.
  • Build a (Better) Global Afterschool ProgramAsia Society
    A self-assessment tool in the QSA format that assesses global learning in your afterschool program.
  • The Partnership for 21st Century SkillsThe Partnership for 21st Century Skills
    A framework and other resources for teaching 21st Century Skills.  Use this for some general ideas, or email them to ask permission to use the whole framework.

General Resources

Homework Time Resources

Literacy Resources

  • Literacy Strategies After School: A Teaching and Learning Strategies Guide, Connecticut After School Network A collection of Common Core State Standard (CCSS) aligned English Language Arts (ELA) activities specifically designed for staff working with students in grades 1-6 during out-of-school time programs.
  • 2010: Year of the Children’s Mystery Book: Mystery Challenge, Carole Marsh
    A challenge to kids to read six mystery books in 2010.  This idea can be incorporated any year into programming to encourage kids to read books of any genre.
  • About Academic Enrichment in Afterschool: Literacy, SEDL
    Use this section of the Afterschool Toolkit to learn more about book discussions, read alouds, dramitizations, and more. Access further resources and support materials on literacy in afterschool.
  •  Dr. Seuss, Random House Books
    Website with information about Dr. Seuss books that also includes games, activities, and resources for parents and teachers.
  • Great Books for Boys , Kidsreads.com
    A list of books for boys to help encourage boys to read.
  • Hank Zipzer, Penguin Group (USA) Inc.
    Website with author information, book information, and quizes and games about the series of books.
  • Jack Prelutsky
    Website where kids can learn more about the poet, read poems, and see letters written to Jack Prelutsky.
  • Margaret Peterson Haddix
    Author’s website that includes discussion guides for nine of her titles, plus bonus information for two books and a suggested reading list by grade level.
  • R. L. Stine
    Website with information on books as well as a section for teachers that includes a writing program to use with students.
  • Read Write Think
    Reading and writing lessons, interactives, calendar activities, and more, right at your fingertips.
  • Reading Is Fundamental
    Free reading resources, activity calendars, story samplers, and more.
  • Shel Silverstein, HarperCollinsPublishers, Inc.
    Author’s website where visitors can play games, write poems, print out free bookmarks and poetry kits and download screensavers, audio tracks and wallpaper.
  • Story Snoops, StorySnoops.com
    Book reviews on Tween and Teen fiction that make it easier for parents, teachers, etc. to find appropriate fiction. Search for books by topic, targeted reader, and more.
  • The World of Fancy Nancy, HarperCollinsPublishers, Inc.
    Website with activities and information for kids and parents.

Science Resources

Social Studies Resources

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day, NASA
    A different astronomy image each day with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
  • Rand McNally Education Resources, Rand McNally
    Free, downloadable maps, lesson plans divided by academic areas, and PDFs that encourage discussion about the continents, country names, the European Union and other geographic topics.
  • National Geographic Education, National Geographic
    Teaching resources and activity ideas that focus on geography, social studies, and science.
  • U.S. States Fast Facts and Trivia, 50states.com
    A site with folders for each state containing facts about the states.  Print these out for Texas to quiz kids on facts about their home state, or look at other states to see what they know about the country.

Physical Education Resources

  • A Running Start, New York Road Runners
    Free online fitness video series designed to teach youth the basics of running.
  • Before and Afterschool Programs , Alliance for a Healthier Generation
    Website with afterschool resources to reduce childhood obesity.
  • CANFIT
    When it comes to improving the health of today’s youth CANFIT is the leader in building community leadership and stimulating change at multiple levels, from individual behavior to public policy.  Check out the CANFIT Physical Activity Pyramid for your Afterschool program here.
  • International Walk to School in the USA, National Center for Safe Routes to School
    Suggestions for how to advocate walking in lesson plans.
  • Let’s Move!
    Let’s Move! is a comprehensive initiative, launched by the First Lady, dedicated to solving the challenge of childhood obesity within a generation, so that children born today will grow up healthier and able to pursue their dreams.
  • Project ACES: The World’s Largest Excercise Class, Youth Fitness Coalition, Inc.
    Learn more about Project ACES (All Children Exercise Simultaneously
  • Skillastics: Creating Fitness Fun, Skillastics
    All inclusive fitness activity kits designed for afterschool.
  • Take a Hike: Add Variety to a Nature Hike
    American Camp Association
    A list of ideas to add variety and learning into hiking.

Technology Resources

  • About Academic Enrichment in Afterschool: Technology, SEDL
    Use this section of the Afterschool Toolkit to learn more about why and how to incorporate technology into your program. Access further resources and support materials on technology in afterschool.
  • Digital Learning, The National Network
    Information and strategies for incorporating technology and digital learning into programs.
  • Educational Games, Media Awareness Network
    Online games that teach students about safely using the Internet.
  • Free Lesson Plans, General Motors
    Lesson plans that encourage youth to explore technology.  Plans are broken up by recommended age levels.

Math Resources

  • About Academic Enrichment in Afterschool: Math, SEDL
    Use this section of the Afterschool Toolkit to learn more about math centers, projects, games, and more. Access further resources and support materials on math in afterschool.
  • IXL
    IXL is an interactive math tool for grades Pre-K through eighth grade.
  • Math Playground, Math Playground
    The site strengthens math skills through math games, word problems, logic puzzles and math videos to connect to school day math activities.
  • Mixing in Math, Mixing in Math
    A bank of activities that incorporate math into programming.

Art Resources

  • About Academic Enrichment in Afterschool: Arts, SEDL
    Use this section of the Afterschool Toolkit to learn more about building skills in arts, putting arts into action, connecting to history and culture, and more. Access further resources and support materials on arts in afterschool.
  • ARTSEDGE: Standards , The Kennedy Center
    Learn about standards in several art forms for all grade levels.
  • Making Musical Instruments at Home, Songs for Teaching
    Multicultural instrument-building for families with step-by-step instructions on building and playing several instruments.
  • Top Ten Arts Books for Youth , Booklist  
    An annotated list of excellent books for youth focused on visual and performing arts.