Public Funding History

State and Federal funding for community-based or school-community partnerships for expanded learning (21st CCLC, Advantage, ESD/SVP, YDP, and Empire State After-School)

State Funding

Empire State After-School:

  • $10 million added in FY18-19 state budget, for a total of $45 million
  • Eligible school districts and community based organizations include Empire State Poverty Reduction Initiative areas, school districts and counties with a child poverty rate over 30% or poverty count between 5,000 and 20,000, and communities experiencing high student homelessness. $2 million in the FY18-19 budget is reserved for high-need school districts in Nassau and Suffolk counties.
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department and the Office of Children and Family Services

Advantage After School:

  • Afterschool programs with priority target of “disconnected/high-need” youth
  • $22.3 million in FY18-19; peak funding of $28.2 million in FY07-08
  • Grants are for five years
  • Administered by the Office of Children and Family Services

Extended School Day/ School Violence Prevention (ESD/SVP):

  • Provide support to students through extended school-day and/or school violence prevention programs
  • $24.3 million in FY18-19; peak funding of $30.2 million in FY07-08
  • Grants are for three years with the possibility of two one-year extensions
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department

Youth Development Program (YDP):

  • Support for providers offering positive youth development programs
  • $15.6 million in FY18-19; peak funding of $37.1 million in FY08-09
  • Distributed by county-based formula
  • Administered by the Office of Children and Family Services
  • Funds are distributed through county Youth Bureaus; in New York City they are part of the Department of Youth and Community Development’s COMPASS/SONYC program

Extended Learning Time:

  • Program to extend the school day, week, or year by adding at least 25 percent more time
  • $21.6 million provided in FY8-19 top continue ELT grants
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department

Community Schools:

  • Program to add support services, such as parent centers, healthcare, and afterschool, to schools
  • Recent research has found that more than 90% of community schools incorporate expanded learning opportunities into their programming
  • $15 million in new funding provided in FY13-14; additional $15 million in FY14-15; no new funding in subsequent years
  • Grants are for three years
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department

Community Schools Aid

  • $200 million in Community Schools Aid provided in FY18-19
  • Funding allocated by formula to school districts with schools identified as “struggling” and “persistently struggling”, as well as school districts identified as “high-need”.
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department

Community Schools Operating and Capital Fund

  • $75 million made available in FY16-17 for competitive grants to support operating and capital costs associated with the transformation of “struggling” and “persistently struggling” schools into community schools.
  • $50 million of this funding is for operating aid and $25 million is for capital investments.
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department

Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP):

  • Program employs youth ages 14 to 24 during the summer months, supporting their transition to the workforce
  • Many participants serve as aides to summer programs for younger children, allowing programs to serve more children
  • $40 million provided in FY18-19

Local Funding

  • Cities and counties often choose to fund expanded learning opportunities through discretionary spending, generally through local Youth Bureaus
  • New York City invests approximately $411 million in the COMPASS, including SONYC, and Beacon initiatives

Federal Funding:

21st Century Community Learning Centers:

  • Programs offer academic enrichment and youth development, particularly for youth at low-performing or high poverty schools, through school-community partnerships
  • $90 million in FFY18; peak funding of $100.5 million in FFY09-10. The New York State Education Department sets aside up to 7% for administration and technical assistance to grantees.
  • Grants are for five years
  • Administered by the New York State Education Department

Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP): The At-Risk Afterschool Snack and Supper Program:

  • Nutrition assistance for afterschool programs to provide free snacks and suppers to youth
  • As of July 1, 2017 the program reimbursed 88 cents per snack and $3.23 per supper
  • Any program located in a school district where 50% or more of enrolled students qualify for free or reduced-price school meals are eligible to receive funding

Summer Food Services Program (SFSP):

  • Provides free, nutritious meals to children eighteen and under in low-income neighborhoods during the months when school is not in session
  • Eligible locations must either be in areas where more than 50% of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunch or, if in a different area, the site must only provide free meals to students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch

Child Care Subsidies:

  • Federal, state, and local support for low-income families that may be used to pay for care for children from birth up to age twelve
  • Approximately 1/2 of funding goes to school-age child care

School District Grants:

  • Certain federal funding for school districts, such as Title I and School Improvement Grants (SIG), can be used for expanded learning opportunities at the discretion of the school district

Statewide Fiscal Map August 2017

Funding Stream Summary

Click the button above and then select “After School Programs” under “Map Community Assets”