Inclusion

horse2As for all students, participation in out-of-school time and expanded learning programs provides students with disabilities the opportunity to become a part of an inclusive environment where they receive extended academic support, partake in extracurricular activities such as sports and arts, develop meaningful relationships with students and adults they may not typically interact with during the school day, and gain greater self-awareness, self-confidence, and appropriate social and emotional skills.

Inclusion is the practice of teaching or including students with disabilities in the same space and programming as students who do not have disabilities. Practicing inclusion means treating students with disabilities as similarly to those without disabilities as possible, ensuring a welcoming and supportive environment for all students. In many situations, inclusion simply requires sensitivity to the needs of individual students –a mindset important to working with all students­– rather than any major changes to the program structure or space.

To learn more about what you can do to run an inclusive afterschool program, see Including All Students: Frequently Asked Questions About Including Students with Disabilities in Afterschool and Summer Programs. This FAQ was developed with the help of the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, the New York State Disabilities Advocacy Association and Network and other experts on inclusion practices. Network for Youth Success would like to extend a big thank you to all those who contributed!

ACT for Youth provides a resource on assessing unconscious bias among youth work professionals and addresses how supervisors and directors can build cultural competence among program staff.

Useful Resources

Below find useful books, websites, and organizations!

Websites

Talking to Kids About Racism and Justice: a list for parents, caregivers & educators

Find a variety of resources on how to discuss racism and justice with kids of all ages. Find books for children from toddlers to 7th and up. This site also features impactful articles, videos, and websites to ensure that you have as much information as possible on this important and difficult topic.  Click here to learn more!

Inclusiveness: Building Stronger Connections

Many people who find themselves drawn to working with youth do so because they had a positive experience with an adult role model during their own childhood. Others enter youth work because they want to be that person — the one they needed growing up. More often than not, youth workers are able to see themselves in the young people they work with. This website offers articles on assessing bias, addressing bias, creating inclusive environments as well as activities and lesson plans to facilitate these conservations. Find more information by clicking here!

LATINO YOUTH OUTREACH: Best Practices Toolkit

Click here to learn more about Latino Youth Outreach and the best practices around it. This Toolkit was created by The National 4-H Council in partnership with their National 4­H Council Hispanic Advisory Committee. Click here to access this toolkit.

Educator Guides for GLSEN Programs

Planning for Back to School? Looking for ways to support Day of Silence? Interested in being more LGBTQ-inclusive during pride month? Check out GLSEN’s website for specific tools and tips related to GLSEN programs, days of action and more! Ready to supplement your curriculum? Explore our LGBTQ-Inclusive and Bullying, Bias & Diversity lesson plans and more by clicking here!

Diversity Toolkit: A Guide to Discussing Identity, Power and Privilege

This toolkit is meant for anyone who feels there is a lack of productive discourse around issues of diversity and the role of identity in social relationships, both on a micro (individual) and macro (communal) level. Perhaps you are a teacher, youth group facilitator, student affairs personnel or manage a team that works with an underserved population. Training of this kind can provide historical context about the politics of identity and the dynamics of power and privilege or help build greater self-awareness. Click here to learn more!

Look Different Toolkits

Use Look Different’s educational resources to help start a conversation on racial, gender, and anti-LGBT bias. To learn more, click here!

Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide

All over the country people are fighting hate, standing up to promote tolerance and inclusion. More often than not, when hate flares up, good people rise up against it — often in greater numbers and with stronger voices. This guide from the Southern Poverty Law Center sets out 10 principles for fighting hate in your community. Click here to find out how you can help fight hate in your community!

Anti-Bias Tools & Strategies

This page by theAnti-Defamation League offers additional resources that provide a wide range of tips, tools, strategies and lessons for K-12 educators, administrators, students and family members to promote safe, respectful and inclusive learning environments. Find more information by clicking here!

The Teaching Transgender Toolkit

As an increasing number of transgender people come out, there is an increased need for the provision of culturally competent and fully inclusive trainings to help create a world that is more affirming of transgender people. This is a critical time for transgender people and related rights – the backlash toward greater acceptance of people who are lesbian, gay or bisexual is being targeted toward transgender people.  As we see from places like Houston, Texas, fear, misinformation, and ignorance about transgender people are being used as a catalyst for campaigns to strip transgender people of their rights.  Education and training is an essential component in protecting and expanding the rights of transgender people.  Up until now, there have been limited resources available for facilitators and trainers to use while leading these efforts.  To address this gap, Dr. Eli R. Green & Luca Maurer, MS, have written The Teaching Transgender Toolkit: A Facilitator’s Guide to Increasing Knowledge, Decreasing Prejudice & Building Skills.

RESOURCES TO HELP YOU PROTECT IMMIGRANTS

These guides and toolkits were developed by United We Dream and/or our partners across the country. Use them to drive local impact in your community to ensure protections and inclusivity for immigrant communities. Access these toolkits here!

Teaching about Controversial or Difficult Issues

Teachers often avoid “hot-button” topics because the issues are so complex, or because they don’t feel prepared to handle the strong feelings and opinions discussion might stir. Morningside Center offers 10 suggestions for how to take some of these issues on in constructive, thoughtful and sensitive ways. Find more information here!

Organizations
Books

Culturally-Responsive Teaching and the Brain, Zaretta Hammond

To close the achievement gap, diverse classrooms need a proven framework for optimizing student engagement. Culturally responsive instruction has shown promise, but many teachers have struggled with its implementation―until now.In this book, Zaretta Hammond draws on cutting-edge neuroscience research to offer an innovative approach for designing and implementing brain-compatible culturally responsive instruction. For more information, click here!

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?, Beverly Daniel Tatum

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America. Click here to learn more!

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood… And the Rest of Ya’ll Too, Christopher Emdin

Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with more than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award-winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too is the much-needed antidote to traditional top-down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike—both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. More information on this book can be found here!